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Species Available to Hunt (A to J)

African Wild Cat

African Wild Cat

African Wild Cat

The African wildcat is sandy brown to yellow-grey in color, with black stripes on the tail.

The fur is shorter than that of the European species It is also considerably smaller: the head-body length is 45 to 75 cm (17.7 to 29.5 inches), the tail 20 to 38 cm (7.87 to 15 inches), and the weight ranges from 3 to 6.5 kg (6.61 to 14.3 lbs). The African wildcat is commonly found in Africa and in the Middle East, in a wide range of habitats: savannas and bushland.

Baboon

Baboon

Baboon

The Baboon inhabits dry forests, gallery forests, and adjoining bush savannas or steppes. The most common baboon found in South Africa is the Chacma baboon.

They are social with a strong family structure, with one dominant male per troop. They are not territorial, but will move long distances in search for food. It has brown to black hair, a hairless, dark-violet or black face with a typical dog-like face, which is surrounded by a small mane, and a tail carried in a round arc.

Blesbuck

Blesbuck

Blesbuck

The Blesbuck is a purplish antelope with a distinctive white face and forehead. Its white face is the origin of its name, because bles is the Afrikaans word for blaze.

The Blesbuck is indigenous to South Africa and is found in large numbers in all South African national parks with open grasslands.

Black Wildebeest

Black Wildebeest

Black Wildebeest

It has a beefy muscular front-heavy appearance with a distinctive robust muzzle, it strides with relatively slender legs and moves gracefully and quietly most of the time.

The Black Wildebeest is one of two wildebeest species. The natural populations of this species, endemic to the southern part of Africa, have been almost completely exterminated, but the species has been reintroduced widely, both in private areas and nature reserves in South Africa.

Blue Wildebeest

Blue Wildebeest

Blue Wildebeest

The Blue Wildebeest, also called the Common Wildebeest, is a large antelope and one of two species of wildebeest. It grows to 115–145 cm shoulder height and attains a body mass of 168–274 kg. They range the open plains, bushveld and dry woodlands of Southern and East Africa, realizing a life span in excess of twenty years. This herbivore is a grazing animal that is often sighted in open grasslands or clearings in a savanna. The male is highly territorial using scent markings and other devices to protect his domain. The largest population is in the Serengeti, numbering over one million animals.

Buffalo

Buffalo

Buffalo

The Cape buffalo is a very robust species. Savannah type buffalo have black or dark brown coats and their horns are curved to a closed crescent. Forest type buffalo are reddish brown in color with horns that curve out backwards and upwards. Calves of both types have red coats. The Cape buffalo is one of the most successful grazers in Africa. It lives in swamps, floodplains as well as mopane grasslands and forests of the major mountains of Africa. Buffalo prefer habitat with dense cover such as reeds and thickets. Herds have also been found in open woodland and grassland.

Bushbuck

Bushbuck

Bushbuck

Bushbuck eat mainly browse but supplement their diet with any other plant matter they can reach.

Bushbuck are active around 24 hours a day but tend to be nocturnal near human habitations. Bushbuck tend to be solitary, though some live in pairs. All bushbucks live within a "home" area. These areas usually overlap other bushbuck home areas. Bushbucks are basically solitary animals and the mature males go out of their way to stay away from each other.

Bushpig

Bushpig

Bushpig

The Bushpig is a member of the pig family that lives in forests, woodland, riverine vegetation and reedbeds in East and Southern Africa. Bushpigs vary greatly in color throughout their range. Seldom seen, but easily identified by their ominous, harsh grunt and pig like appearance, this wily night-time raider with an appetite for domestic crops, infuriates farmers with destructive forages into nearby farmlands.

Caracal

Caracal

Caracal

The caracal is distributed over Africa and the Middle East. Its chief habitat is dry steppes and semi deserts, but it also inhabits woodlands, savannah, and scrub forests. They generally prefer open country, so long as there is sufficient cover, in the form of bushes and rocks, from which to hide. The caracal is a slender, yet muscular, cat, with long legs and a short tail. Males typically weigh 13 to 18 kilograms (29 to 40 lb), while females weigh about 11 kilograms (24 lb).. Compared to lynxes, it has longer legs, shorter fur, and a slimmer appearance.

Civet Cat

Civet Cat

Civet Cat

Civet Cats have a broadly cat-like general appearance, though the muzzle is extended and often pointed, rather like an otter or a mongoose. They range in length from about 17 to 28 in (43 to 71 cm) (excluding their long tails) and in weight from about 3 to 10 lb (1.4 to 4.5 kg). Favored habitats include woodland, savanna, and mountain biomes and tropical rainforest.

Common Duiker

Common Duiker

Common Duiker

The Common Duiker, also known as the Gray or Bush Duiker, is a small antelope with small horns found everywhere in Africa south of the Sahara, excluding the horn of Africa and the rainforests of the central and western parts of the continent. Generally they are found in habitat that has sufficient vegetation cover to allow them to hide—savannah and hilly areas, including the fringes of human settlements.

Common Reedbuck

Common Reedbuck

Common Reedbuck

Reedbucks average 85 cm at the shoulder, and weigh around 70 kg. Reedbucks live in valley and upland areas, where they eat grasses and reeds. They have grey-brown coats with a white underbelly and black forelegs. Males have ridged horns of around 35 cm, which grow backwards and then curve forwards. Common Reedbuck are an antelope of the open grass plains, often found near water. They usually occur in groups of 3 - 6 animals or are solitary. Territories are occupied by pairs that communicate by the species characteristic whistling call. They tend to prefer to graze at night when food in abundant, but can often be seen in the late afternoon or early morning. When left undisturbed, they will become very tame often venturing into farmer's gardens at night.

Crocodile

Crocodile

Crocodile

Crocodiles are large aquatic reptiles that live throughout the tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Crocodiles tend to congregate in freshwater habitats like rivers, lakes, wetlands and sometimes in brackish water. They feed mostly on vertebrates like fish, reptiles, and mammals. Bony plates, called osteoderms, form a kind of armor in their thick skin. Their teeth, about 30 to 40 in each jaw, are set into sockets in the jawbones and interlock when the mouth is closed. On land, crocodilians move quickly in a belly crawl but can also gallop and walk mammal-like on all four legs.

Eland

Eland

Eland

The Common Eland is considered the largest species of "antelope", though in many respects the Elands are quite bovine. Females have a tan coat, while males have a darker tan coat with a blueish-grey tinge. There may also be a series of white stripes vertically on the sides of bulls (mainly in parts of the Karoo in South Africa). Males have dense fur on their foreheads and a large dewlap. Both sexes have horns, with a steady spiral ridge (resembling that of the bushbuck). The female's horns are wider set and thinner than the male's. They eat branches leaves and berries.

Elephant

Elephant

Elephant

Elephants are the largest land animals. The elephant has a very thick skin which may reach a thickness of 3-4cm. African elephants have five well-formed digits on both fore and hind feet. Elephants move in family groups, crashing through the forest, tearing down trees and shrubs for food and then cycling back later on, when the area has regrown. The African Elephant are found in most parts south of the Sahara. There body and ivory sizes vary from country to country, due to the different habitations they survive in.

Gemsbuck

Gemsbuck

Gemsbuck

Gemsbuck are light brownish-grey to tan in colour, with lighter patches to the bottom rear of the rump. Their tails are long and black in colour. Both genders have long straight horns. Gemsbuck live in herds of about 10-40 animals, which consist of a dominant male, a few non-dominant males, and females. The Gemsbok prefers the arid and semi-arid open grassland, scrub and light open woodland. It is very adapt for desert and semi-desert life with the ability to go for extended periods without water. Occasionally they do penetrate deep into savanna woodlands searching for new feeding grounds in the more open areas within them.

Genet

Genet

Genet

Most of them have spotted coats and long, banded tails, small heads, and large ears. Like civets, genets have strong musk glands, which are used to mark territory, and they are known to perform handstands when doing this. Genets possess extremely long tails--typically over 1 to 1.5 times the length of their bodies--providing a highly effective counter-weight that enables them to easily maintain balance as they leap from tree limb to tree limb. They live exclusively in Africa and Northwest Africa and throughout Europe.

Giraffe

Giraffe

Giraffe

The giraffe is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species, and the largest ruminant. The giraffe's scientific name, which is similar to its antiquated English name of camelopard, refers to its irregular patches of color on a light background, which bear a token resemblance to a leopard's spots. Its range extends from Central Africa to South Africa. Giraffes usually inhabit savannas, grasslands, or open woodlands. However, when food is scarce they will venture into areas with denser vegetation. They prefer areas with plenty of acacia growth.

Hippo

Hippo

Hippo

The hippopotamus is semi-aquatic, inhabiting rivers and lakes where territorial bulls preside over a stretch of river and groups of 5 to 30 females and young. They emerge at dusk to graze on grass. While hippopotamuses rest near each other in the water, grazing is a solitary activity and hippos are not territorial on land. The hippopotamus is recognizable by its barrel-shaped torso, enormous mouth and teeth, nearly hairless body, stubby legs and tremendous size. It is the third-largest land mammal by weight. Despite its stocky shape and short legs, it can easily outrun a human.

Hyena

Hyena

Hyena

All species have a distinctly bear-like gait, due to their front legs being longer than their back legs. The Aardwolf, Striped Hyena, and Brown Hyena have striped pelts and manes lining the top of their necks which erect when frightened. The Spotted Hyena's fur is considerably shorter and spotted rather than striped. Three of the four species of hyena are restricted to sub-Saharan Africa, where they live in environments such as savannah, bushland and desert. The Striped hyena, is found in northern and eastern Africa as well as in Asia from the Middle East to India.

Impala

Impala

Impala

They are normally reddish-brown in color, have lighter flanks and white underbellies with a characteristic "M" marking on the rear. Males, referred to as rams, have lyre-shaped horns, Females, referred to as ewes, have no horns. Impalas are among the dominant species in many savannas. They can adapt to different environments by being grazers in some areas and browsers in others. They graze when the grass is green and growing, and browse at other times. They will browse on shoots, seedpods and foliage.

Jackal

Jackal

Jackal

They are omnivorous predators of small to medium-sized animals, as well as scavengers when the need be. The jackal's long legs and curved canine teeth are adapted for hunting small mammals, Big feet and fused leg bones give them a physique for long-distance running, capable of maintaining speeds of 16 km/h (9.9 mph) for extended periods of time. Jackals are crepuscular, most active at dawn and dusk.

Species Available to Hunt (K to Z)

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Tall and majestic with the most spectacular horns, one of Africa's most sought after trophies. This animal certainly ranks as one of Africa's most handsome species. The short smooth coat varies in general color from grayish-fawn to grayish brown, with old bulls becoming grayer and their necks becoming darker in the breeding season. Distinctive features include a white chevron-shaped mark extending from the eyes across the upper nose and exceptionally large pink ears. The black-tipped, bushy tail is white underneath and there are black garters on the upper legs. Preferred habitat includes mixed scrub woodland, acacia and bush on lowlands, hills and mountains. They are particularly partial to rugged broken country where they have a cover of woodland and a nearby supply of water. Can survive on farms, provided sufficient cover remains.

Klipspringer

Klipspringer

Klipspringer

Klipspringers are relatively small animals compared to some of their larger antelope cousins. Only the males have horns. They stand on the tips of their hooves. They do not have regular fur like other antelope, but rather short, thick hollow spikes, which forms a thick and dense speckled "salt and pepper" patterned coat of an almost olive shade. Its coat serves as a protection against sharp objects as it moves in rocky areas. Klipspringer have a restricted habitat preference, namely to very rocky environments of mountainous areas and small hills. This allows this nimble-footed antelope to escape from its predators.

Lechwe

Lechwe

Lechwe

The Lechwe, is an antelope found in South Africa as far as Botswana, Zambia and Kongto. They are golden brown with a white belly.

Males are darker in colour, but general hue varies depending on subspecies. The long spiral structured horns are vaguely lyre-shaped.

Leopard

Leopard

Leopard

Once distributed across eastern and southern Asia and Africa, from Siberia to South Africa, the leopard's range of distribution has decreased to be chiefly found in sub-Saharan Africa. The Leopard has relatively short legs and a long body with a large skull, with a beautiful spotted fur. Leopards hide their pray in trees, where they feed on it when hungry. Since their habitat has been reduced over decades, they have became a nuisance to cattle and sheep farmers. This has resulted in near distinction and Leopards are thus strongly regulated by Nature conservationists.

Lion

Lion

Lion

Loins is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Lions live for ten to fourteen years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than twenty years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than ten years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. Lions are unusually social compared to other cats. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Mountain Reedbuck

Mountain Reedbuck

Mountain Reedbuck

The Mountain Reedbuck is an antelope found in mountainous areas of much of Sub-Saharan Africa. The Mountain Reedbuck has a grey coat with a white underbelly and reddish-brown head and shoulders. The male has ridged horns which curve forwards. The Mountain Reedbuck lives in thick mountainous forest, where it eats grasses and leaves. It forms herds of around five individuals, including a single mature male.

Nyala

Nyala

Nyala

The Nyala is a Southern African antelope. It is a spiral-horned dense-forest antelope that is uncomfortable in open spaces and is most often seen at water holes. Nyalas live alone or in small family groups of up to 10 individuals. The male has loosely spiraled horns and a long fringe on throat and underparts; the female has no horns and no noticeable fringe. The male is black and grey, white on the face and neck, with vertical white stripes on the body. The female is reddish brown with clear striping. Although they frequent thick vegetation, they will venture into open areas to graze fine grasses and forbes.

Ostrich

Ostrich

Ostrich

The Ostrich is a large flightless bird native to Africa. It is distinctive in its appearance, with a long neck and legs and the ability to run at maximum speeds of about 70 km/h (45 mph), the top land speed of any bird. Ostriches formerly occupied Africa north and south of the Sahara, East Africa, Africa south of the rain forest belt, and much of Asia Minor. Today Ostriches prefer open land and are native to the savannas and Sahel of Africa, both north and south of the equatorial forest zone. In Southwest Africa they inhabit the semidesert or true desert.

Porcupine

Porcupine

Porcupine

Porcupines are rodents with a coat of sharp spines, or quills, that defend them from predators. Porcupines are the third largest of the rodents. They are rounded, large and slow. Porcupines come in various shades of brown, grey, and the unusual white. The common porcupine is a herbivore. It eats leaves, twigs and green plants and in the winter it may eat bark. It often climbs trees to find food. It is mostly nocturnal, but will sometimes forage for food in the day. Porcupines have become a pest in Kenya and are eaten as a delicacy.

Red Hartebeest

Red Hartebeest

Red Hartebeest

Male hartebeest are a dark brown colour while females are yellow brown. Both sexes have horns which can reach lengths up to 70 cm (27 in).

Hartebeest live in grassland and open forest where they eat grass.

Rhino

Rhino

Rhino

The rhinoceros family is characterized by its large size, with all of the species able to reach one tonne or more in weight with an herbivorous diet. A Rhino has a thick protective skin, 1.5–5 cm thick, formed from layers of collagen positioned in a lattice structure. They have relatively small brains for mammals this size (400–600 g) and a large horn. Rhinoceros have acute hearing and sense of smell, but poor eyesight. Black rhinos are more aggressive and have various habitats, but mainly areas with dense, woody vegetation, while White rhinos live in savannahs with water holes, mud wallows and shade trees.

Roan Antelope

Roan Antelope

Roan Antelope

Named for the "roan' colour (a reddish brown), they have a lighter underbelly, white eyebrows and cheeks and a black face, lighter in females.There is a short erect mane, a very light beard and prominent red nostrils.

Roan Antelope are found in woodland and Tropical and subtropical grassland savannahs

Sable Antelope

Sable Antelope

Sable Antelope

Sable Antelope are distinctively black, while females are chestnut to dark brown and darkening as they mature. Both sexes have a white underbelly, white cheeks and a white chin. They have a shaggy mane on the back of their neck. Sable antelope have ringed horns which arch backward. The male has a thicker horn than the female. Sable Antelope live in savannah woodlands and grasslands during the dry season where they eat mid-length grass and leaves.

Serval Cat

Serval Cat

Serval Cat

The serval is a medium-sized cat, measuring 59 to 92 centimetres (23 to 36 in) in head-body length, with a relatively short tail. They have a similar appearance as the Cheetah in being spotted, and they belong to the same family and sub-family. Its main habitat is the savanna, although melanistic individuals are more usually found in mountainous areas. The serval needs watercourses within its territory, so it does not live in semi-deserts or dry steppes. Servals also avoid dense equatorial jungles, although they may be found along forest fringes.

Springbuck

Springbuck

Springbuck

The Springbuck is a medium sized gazelle. There are four species, namely, the Copper, Black , White and Common Springbuck, which is brown and white colored . They all have a distinct behavior of pluming the hair on their backs during mating season or when they die. Springbok inhabit the dry inland areas of south and southwestern Africa. Their range extends from the northwestern part of South Africa through the Kalahari desert into Namibia and Botswana. Springbok also inhabit the vast grasslands of the Free State and the open shrub lands of the greater and smaller Karoo.

Steenbuck

Steenbuck

Steenbuck

Steenbuck are one the more adaptable antelope in Africa. They can be found wherever there is suitable food and cover. They can be found in a wide variety of habitat but prefer short grassland with shrubs for cover. Their pelage (coat) is any shade from fawn to rufous, typically rather orange. The underside, including chin and throat, is white, as is the ring around the eye. Ears are large with "finger-marks" on the inside. Males carry straight, smooth, parallel horns. There is a black crescent-shape between the ears, a long black bridge to the glossy black nose, and a black circular scent-gland in front of the eye.

Tsessebe

Tsessebe

Tsessebe

Tsessebe are a rusty red colour with black legs, chest and a black strip running from forehead to the tip of the nose. The horns are lyre-shaped. Tsessebe live in savannah and floodplains where they eat mainly grass. They are considered to be one of the fastest antelope on earth.

Vaal Reedbuck

Vaal Reedbuck

Vaal Reedbuck

Utilizes a more exposed habitat than the Mountain Reedbuck. Independent of water. Long, thin neck with very long pointed upright ears. The horns are straight and stand upright. It lives in rocky mountains, mountain slopes and plateaus with sufficient grass and a few shrubs and trees. They are territorial and form herds of up to 12 animals. The Reedbuck grazes with short resting periods and rests for 3 hours during the hottest part of the day.

Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Their coats are reddish brown in colour and become progressively darker with age. They have a white 'bib' under their throats and a white ring on their rumps surrounding their tails. The long spiral structured horns, found only in males, sweep back and up. Waterbuck are found in scrub and savanna areas near water where they eat grass. Despite its name, the waterbuck does not spend much time in the water, but will take refuge there to escape predators.

Warthog

Warthog

Warthog

A warthog is identifiable by the two pairs of tusks protruding from the mouth, which are used as weapons against predators. The tusk will curve 90 degrees or more from the root, and the tusk will not lie flat on a table, as it curves somewhat backwards as it grows. The tusks are used for digging, for combat with other hogs, and in defense against predators—the lower set sre vey sharp and can inflict severe wounds. Warthogs prefer plains regions and avoid forests, thick bush and mountains. They are found in savannas, woodlands, grasslands and frequently at waterholes where they dig in the marsh and wallow in the mud.

Zebra

Zebra

Zebra

Zebra are African equids best known for their distinctive black and white stripes. Their stripes come in different patterns unique to each individual. Two species are found in South Africa, the Burchell Zebra and the Mountain Zebra. They can be found in a variety of habitats, such as grasslands, savannas, woodlands, thorny scrublands, mountains and coastal hills.

Prices & Daily Rates

Rates & prices will be communicated via e-mail on request.

Daily Rates Include:

  • Accommodation
  • Daily Laundry
  • All Liquor and Beverages in Camp
  • Experienced Professional Hunters
  • Trained Staff, Trackers and Skinners
  • Field preparation of Trophies
  • All Transportation within Hunting Areas
  • Daily rate calculated by overnight stay in Camp
  • 14 % VAT on daily rates

Daily Rates Exclude:

  • Extra Car Hire for big groups, air charters before, during and after Safari
  • Taxidermy process and Shipping charges
  • Gratuities to Staff and Professional Hunters and Camp Staff
  • Trophy Fees of species taken
  • Animals wounded and lost will be paid in full plus 14 % VAT
  • Rifle Hire at $ 70 per client per day, including Ammo and cost
  • Specially requested imported Food & Drinks
  • Cost of Telephone calls and Faxes made by clients
  • Conservation fund $ 10 per Trophy taken and exported
  • CITES license fees where applicable
  • Permit fees where applicable

 Please Note:

  • Any Charter and flight quotes                 subject to change and availability
  • $500 pick-up fee on donated hunts
  • Budget for remote Hunting areas !              Some of Africa's most remote hunting areas requires additional expenses, due to the distance from civilization and the logistics involved in getting there and maintaining the camp to the best facilities for hunters.

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